jeffmcmillan

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About jeffmcmillan

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  1. Putting two torx bits in a set is just a tease. I've had 12pc torx sets that still dont always have the right size and they expect two to be useful? Not to mention nothing with torx uses fewer than three different sizes. Might as well put in a dozen flat heads like everyone else and save me the disappointment when the last two screws are T7 instead of T6. /rant
  2. You make a good point, the design is to force the teeth in on the bolt which means a lot of force out on the socket. Its actually a lot like a gearless ratchet mechanism
  3. How'd the blades fare?
  4. That drill kit at least is always at 99 around christmas, but the 199 subcompact brushless kit really outshines it
  5. I bet most of us have individual sockets, regular wrenches, and regular screwdrivers that cost more than the corresponding sets
  6. As much as it pains me not to push you towards a Dewalt like mine, I think you'll be very happy with that one, especially for the price.
  7. Why not a 1/2" drill so once the old 3/8" is fixed you're not left with two of the same thing? All my experience with 3/8" drills has been that they're built to a low price point while the 1/2" drills are built like tanks. Harbor freight is the only 3/8" drill I think is worth the price, and only because it's dirt cheap.
  8. Not only is the motor pretty clearly positioned like a sidewinder, but they call it a "Rear handle circular saw." I'm disappointed I recall that quite a few of the non-skil worm drives are actually hypoid saws now. Maybe because the cost of sintering fancy shaped hypoid gears is comparable to a cheap worm and spur setup now.
  9. I wish it was easier to find toasters with flat sides for this reason. Stupid rounded modern looking things won't work for pizza, grilled cheese, or garlic bread.
  10. 1. Aluminum and copper gum up so they'd be slower, and won't spark. It's definitely steel, just not hard steel. 2. Second, that belt grinder is running really fast. You can hear it and see a lot of sparks getting carried back to the cut along the entire belt 3. It's an extremely low grit belt meant for this type of fast material removal. Even with all of that, it's a pretty impressive sanding belt.
  11. Those are bs. There's a reason filters have a large surface area, and masks cover your mouth too.
  12. Homeowners don't care about weight, and five cheap cells with a junk motor will perform on par with three good cells and a high end motor. Three junk cells and a cheap motor isn't good for much besides being cheap. The big deal of Ryobi is that it's cheap, functional tools since people who only care about cheap and not functional can get cheaper versions at harbor freight.
  13. With the extra cells, Kobalt should beat Milwaukee by a healthy 20% margin, not just come in close. Not to mention they probably paired the test with Kobalt's optimum torque. Most of the latest version tools are extremely close because with the same power going in the same power comes out. If they want a fair comparison, Hilti uses the same voltage. That test would be amusing.
  14. I'll be one of the first to admit they're not as magical as we pretend, but for consistent quality at a reasonable price and excellent availability they blow everything else away. It's not that they're the best cutting blade, just the best combination of everything for circular blades and abrasives too not just sawzall blades.
  15. I bet that's the clutch torque Realistically you never get that 1000in-lb out of one of the drills because it's the hard torque when it's stalled. The break your wrist but not actually drive anything torque.